Journal cover Journal topic
Geochronology Advances in geochronological science
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2020-6
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2020-6
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: short communication/technical note 17 Mar 2020

Submitted as: short communication/technical note | 17 Mar 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal GChron.

Technical note: A prototype transparent-middle-layer data management and analysis infrastructure for cosmogenic-nuclide exposure dating

Greg Balco Greg Balco
  • Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Road, Berkeley CA 94550, USA

Abstract. Geologic dating methods for the most part do not directly measure ages. Instead, interpreting a geochemical observation as a geologically useful parameter – an age or a rate – requires an interpretive middle layer of calculations and supporting data sets. Both of these are the subject of active research and evolve rapidly, so any synoptic analysis requires complete, repeated recalculation of ages from a growing data set of raw observations, using a constantly improving calculation method. Many important applications of geochronology involve regional or global analyses of large and growing data sets, so this characteristic is an obstacle to progress in these applications. This paper describes the ICE-D database project, a prototype computational infrastructure for dealing with this obstacle in one geochronological application – cosmogenic-nuclide exposure-dating – that aims to enable visualization or analysis of large, diverse data sets by making middle-layer calculations dynamic and transparent to the user. An important aspect of this infrastructure is that it is designed as a forward-looking research tool rather than a backward-looking archive: only observational data (which do not become obsolete) are stored, and derived data (which become obsolete as soon as the middle-layer calculations are improved) are not stored, but instead calculated dynamically at the time data are needed by an analysis application. This minimizes lock-in effects associated with archiving derived results subject to rapid obsolescence, and allows assimilation of both new observational data and improvements to middle-layer calculations without creating additional overhead at the level of the analysis application.

Greg Balco

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 08 May 2020)
Status: open (until 08 May 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
  • RC1: 'Review', Sebastian Kreutzer, 31 Mar 2020 Printer-friendly Version

Greg Balco

Greg Balco

Viewed

Total article views: 176 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
137 38 1 176 3 2
  • HTML: 137
  • PDF: 38
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 176
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 17 Mar 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 17 Mar 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 128 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 127 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 01 Apr 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Geologic dating methods generally do not directly measure ages. Instead, interpreting a geochemical measurement as an age requires a middle layer of calculations and supporting data, and the fact that this layer continually improves is an obstacle to synoptic analysis of geochronological data. This paper describes a prototype data management and analysis system that addresses this obstacle by making the middle-layer calculations transparent and dynamic to the user.
Geologic dating methods generally do not directly measure ages. Instead, interpreting a...
Citation