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Geochronology Advances in geochronological science
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2019-6
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2019-6
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 26 Jun 2019

Submitted as: research article | 26 Jun 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geochronology (GChron).

ESR-thermochronometry of the Hida range of the Japanese Alps: Validation and future potential

Georgina E. King1, Sumiko Tsukamoto2, Frédéric Herman1, Rabiul H. Biswas1, Shigeru Sueoka3, and Takahiro Tagami4 Georgina E. King et al.
  • 1Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics, Universityof Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • 2Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics, Hannover, Germany
  • 3Tono Geoscience Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Toki, Japan
  • 4Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Abstract. The electron spin resonance (ESR) of quartz has previously been shown to have potential for determining rock cooling histories, however this technique remains underdeveloped. In this study, we explore the ESR of a suite of samples from the Hida range of the Japanese Alps. We develop measurement protocols and models to constrain the natural trapped charge concentration as well as the parameters that govern signal growth and signal thermal decay. The thermal stability of the Al and Ti-centres is similar to that of the luminescence of feldspar. Inverting the ESR data for cooling yields similar thermal histories to paired luminescence data from the same samples. However, a series of synthetic inversions show that whereas the luminescence of feldspar can only resolve minimum cooling histories of ∼160 °C/Myr over timescales of 103–5 a, quartz ESR may resolve cooling histories as low as 25–50 °C/Myr over timescales of 103–7 a. This difference arises because quartz ESR has a higher dating limit than the luminescence of feldspar. These results imply that quartz ESR will be widely applicable in the constraint of late-stage rock cooling histories, providing new insights into landscape evolution over late-Quaternary timescales.

Georgina E. King et al.
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Georgina E. King et al.
Georgina E. King et al.
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Latest update: 20 Oct 2019
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Short summary
Rates of landscape evolution over the past million years are difficult to quantify. This study develops a technique which is able to measure changes in rock cooling rates (related to landscape evolution) over this timescale. The technique is based on the electron spin resonance dating of quartz minerals. Measurement protocols and new numerical models are proposed that describe these data, allowing their translation into rock cooling rates.
Rates of landscape evolution over the past million years are difficult to quantify. This study...
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